17 Hanging Succulents To Add Greenery To Your Home

hanging garden succulent plants similar twine pots | 17 Hanging Succulents To Add Greenery To Your Home | Featured

Hanging succulents are fun to grow, but the lush greenery they add to your space is the best part about growing trailing succulents.

If you are looking to add some hanging foliage to your home, you will love this roundup of eye-catching trailing succulents that come in all shapes and lengths.

RELATED: The Best Pots and Soil For Succulents | Everything You Need To Know

17 Magnificent Hanging Succulents That Will Add Rich Foliage to Your Home

 

1. Grey Fishhooks Senecio

 

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Like other succulents, this gets its name from its bluish-green hook-like leaves that can trail up to four inches long, creating the perfect greenery for your indoors and outdoors.

Be sure to space out your watering sessions and ensure the soil drains completely.

2. Fishbone Cactus (Epiphyllum Anguliger)

 

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Though native to Mexico, you can still grow the zigzag cactus as an ornamental in the right conditions for a beautiful trail and a fragrant sweet scent for your indoors.

The fishbone cactus thrives indoors in high humidity and filtered light.

3. Medusa Head (Euphorbia Caput-Medusae)

 

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This South African native succulent has numerous serpent-like stems resembling the Medusa hence the name. The deep-green stems start off growing upwards and only begin to hang during maturity.

While Medusa heads are happy in direct sunlight, you will need to move them indoors during winter.

4. String Of Beads (Senecio Herreianus)

 

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These hanging succulents are also native to South Africa. And though they resemble a string of pearls, it is seldom for these succulents to come around. The string of beads has pointier leaves with a more defined oval shape.

It’s important to note that the string of beads plant is easily affected by frost.

5. String Of Bananas (Senecio Radicans)

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Growing the string of bananas in your hanging planters will provide room for the succulent’s showy stems. Not to mention, the colorful cinnamon-scented blooms break the lush green of the mini-banana shaped leaves.

Only practice deep watering when the soil is a few inches dry and space out your watering sessions.

6. Burro’s Tail (Sedum Morganianum)

 

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This Mexican native succulent is also known as lamb’s or donkey’s tail. Its long trailing stems produce long lime-green and blue-green pointy leaves and have a tail-like appearance.

These will make a great addition to your hanging succulents collection as long as you keep them away from direct sunlight.

7. String Of Hearts (Ceropegia Linearis Woodii)

 

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This South African native succulent is your go-to if you want something that hangs anywhere from 183cm. Interestingly, the pale to dark-green layered heart-shaped leaves are magnificent to look at.

To help them thrive, the string of hearts will do well in indirect sunlight.

8. Rat Tail Cactus (Aporocactus Flagelliformis)

 

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Rat tail cactus will hang up to one meter tall and will thrive both indoors and outdoors. It produces eye-catching pink and red blooms in maturity.

RELATED: Plant a Living Picture With A Succulent Vertical Garden

9. String Of Nickels (Dischidia Nummularia)

 

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In tropical rain forests, the string of nickels grows on tree trunks, rocks, and other plants. But as a hanging succulent, it produces long trails with flat round coin-like leaves with a blue-grayish color and produces creamy white blooms when they mature.

The right type of well-drained soil is vital for this epiphytic succulent’s survival.

10. Calico Kitten (Crasulla Pelucida Variegata)

 

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How would you like an assortment of multi-colored heart-shaped leaves? Calico kitten will have just that and more.

Grow your calico kitten in different light conditions for a colorful hanging leaves arrangement. Better still, expose your calico kitten to direct sunlight for the leaves to turn purple.

11. String Of Pearls (Senecio Rowleyanus)

 

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The string of pearls or the string of peas gets its name from its pea-shaped leaves and stems. While the string of pearls is versatile and will grow anywhere with well-drained soil, it will die in the frost.

12. Hindu Rope (Hoya Carnosa)

 

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The Hindu rope is not the trailing succulent you see every day. Its thick and heart-shaped leaves will look great hanging on the edges of a planter basket.

To care, water frequently during hot weather. These hanging succulents will do great in indirect sunlight to partial shade growing conditions.

13. Baby Donkey Tail (Sedum Burrito)

 

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Baby donkey tail plant is commonly confused with the Burro’s tail succulent.

While they both have lime-green and blue-green leaves, baby donkey tail has smaller and shorter leaves, denser and much more fleshy on the long trailing stems.

14. Ruby Necklace (Othana Capensis)

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This exquisite trailing succulent produces vibrant reddish-purple stems with green-bluish fleshy leaves that are bean-shaped. In maturity, the ruby necklace produces yellow blooms that resemble daisies.

Unlike other succulents, the ruby necklace thrives in direct sunlight.

15. Peanut Cactus (Echinopsis Chemaecereus)

 

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You will love the peanut cactus if you are looking for a succulent that does not trail too long. Clumped finger-like stems of about 10cm produce orange-red blooms.

16. Sedum Petite Bicolor ( Crassula Pellucida Marginalis)

If you are looking for something perennial, Sedum petite bicolor is your succulent of choice. This succulent is ideal for hanging to takeover walls. It has beautiful greenish-grey leaves with a touch of pink around the edges.

Sedum petite bicolor succulents are versatile, low maintenance, and will flourish almost anywhere.

17. Monkey’s Tail (Hildewintera Colademononis)

 

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These Bolivia native cacti grow upright. The light green long stems are covered in soft and white hairy spines, almost like a monkey’s tail. And produce magenta or bright red blooms to lighten up your hanging gardens.

Though they are happy in full sunlight, they will appreciate frequent watering during hot days.

Watch this video by Marychris Bende on planting trailing succulents:

Choosing the right hanging succulents to grow can be challenging, but with these succulents ideas, you cannot make a wrong choice. Also, you get to combine as many as you want.

Why grow one when you can grow more!

Which of these will you be adding to your trailing plants collection? Leave us a comment below!

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